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You are here: Home Investigating corruption How the CCC investigates corruption
You are here: Home Investigating corruption How the CCC investigates corruption
You are here: Home Investigating corruption How the CCC investigates corruption

How the CCC investigates corruption

The aim of a CCC investigation is to:

  • determine whether there is evidence of criminal conduct (matter is then referred to the Director of Public Prosecutions to consider prosecution) or conduct warranting a disciplinary sanction (matter is then referred to CEO of an agency/unit of public administration to consider disciplinary action; in certain circumstances the CCC may initiate action in the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal (QCAT) for corrupt conduct.)
  • clear a person’s name of the allegations made against them
  • find systemic or procedural weaknesses in an agency and recommend solutions to address them.

In some cases, police officers seconded to the CCC can make arrests and instigate criminal charges. In the case of a disputed sanction, the CCC can request review by the QCAT.

Investigative powers

The Crime and Corruption Act 2001 and the Police Powers and Responsibilities Act 2000 provide the CCC with special powers to investigate allegations of corruption.

These include search, surveillance and seizure powers, and the power to conduct coercive hearings that compel people to attend and give evidence, and produce documents and other material.

The CCC may conduct joint investigations with agencies, using CCC powers and in-house expertise in intelligence, financial analysis, forensic computing, research and covert investigative techniques to:

  • hold public and closed investigative hearings
  • compel people to give testimony
  • intercept telephone communications.

See also: Procedures for dealing with complaints about corruption

    Last updated: 01 October 2015

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