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You are here: Home About the CCC
You are here: Home About the CCC
You are here: Home About the CCC

Role of the CCC

The Crime and Corruption Commission (CCC) is a statutory body set up to combat and reduce the incidence of major crime and corruption in the public sector in Queensland. Its functions and powers are set out in the Crime and Corruption Act 2001.

The CCC investigates both crime and corruption, has oversight of both the police and the public sector, and protects witnesses.  It is the only integrity agency in Australia with this range of functions. In brief, the CCC:

  • investigates organised crime, paedophilia, terrorist activity and other serious crime referred to it for investigation
  • receives and investigates allegations of serious or systemic corrupt conduct
  • has a statutory function for crime and corruption prevention
  • helps recover the proceeds of crime
  • provides the witness protection service for the state of Queensland
  • conducts research on crime, policing or other relevant matters.

Partnerships

In combating major crime and corruption, the CCC works closely with state, national and international law enforcement and anti-corruption agencies.  Partnerships arrangements can include:

  • sharing intelligence products and operational resources
  • using its coercive powers in support of other agencies' investigations
  • participating in joint investigations.

Peer agencies

Australia-wide, the CCC’s peer agencies are:

  • Independent Commission Against Corruption, New South Wales
  • Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission, Victoria
  • Integrity Commission, Tasmania
  • Independent Commissioner Against Corruption, South Australia
  • Corruption and Crime Commission, Western Australia
  • Police Integrity Commission, New South Wales.
Last updated: 09 May 2016

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