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You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Perceptions of Queensland public service and local government — 11.10.2011
You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Perceptions of Queensland public service and local government — 11.10.2011
You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Perceptions of Queensland public service and local government — 11.10.2011

Perceptions of Queensland public service and local government — 11.10.2011

The Crime and Misconduct Commission has released the results of two public surveys which measure the community’s current perceptions of the public service and local government in Queensland.

CMC Acting Director, Research, Dr Rebecca Denning says the surveys help the CMC assess changes in public opinion about the behaviour and integrity of people in public service roles and local government, and the willingness to use complaints services.

‘This allows the CMC to recommend corrective action to public sector agencies as well as informing us about how we can improve our services,’ Dr Denning said.

‘As outlined in the reports – Public perceptions of local government and Public perceptions of the public service – the surveys show that Queenslanders continue to believe most local government and public service employees are honest.

‘However, we have seen some changes since our last survey in 2008. The results indicate that public expectations about complaints handling are not being met, particularly in local government.

‘Public dissatisfaction with how complaints were handled in local government has increased (from 51% in 2008 to 62% in 2010), but remained steady in the public service (from 57% in 2008 to 55% in 2010).

‘While the public believes that the likelihood of detection for misconduct in local government has increased, about half the respondents continue to believe detection for misconduct in both local governments and public service agencies is unlikely. Those surveyed also had less confidence that complaints are being properly investigated.

‘It is vital that the public has confidence in the CMC and other public sector agencies to properly manage complaints and investigate.

‘Without that confidence the community is less inclined to lodge a complaint and that can lead to poor employee behaviour going unchecked.

‘The CMC is currently working with local governments and public service agencies to implement improved integrity and complaints management systems. By strengthening their culture of integrity staff will be better placed to deliver services and handle customer complaints.

‘This will lead to improved public confidence and client perceptions in these organisations and potentially reverse the trends identified in our surveys,’ Dr Denning said.

View the reportsPublic perceptions of local government and Public perceptions of the public service.

Last updated: 17 December 2011

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