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You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 14 November 2005 – 9 June 2006 Property crime costs Queenslanders tens of millions each year — 16.12.2005
You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 14 November 2005 – 9 June 2006 Property crime costs Queenslanders tens of millions each year — 16.12.2005
You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 14 November 2005 – 9 June 2006 Property crime costs Queenslanders tens of millions each year — 16.12.2005

Property crime costs Queenslanders tens of millions each year — 16.12.2005

Property crime remains the most commonly reported offence in Queensland, costing the state tens of millions of dollars a year and placing a substantial strain on police resources, according to a Crime and Misconduct Commission report.

The CMC’s Strategic Intelligence Unit developed the report, Property crime in Queensland – an intelligence assessment, to reveal the nature and extent of organised criminal activity within Queensland’s property crime market.

CMC Director, Intelligence, Chris Keen, says while there has been a decrease in property offences, it still makes up 38 per cent of reported crimes in Queensland and, due to the volume and, at times, lack of investigative leads, property crime is often difficult for police to pursue.

‘Our intelligence report highlights the vast nature of the property crime market and shows the need to foster relationships between law enforcement agencies and the private sector, such as insurance companies and retailers, if we are to successfully combat this crime,’ Mr Keen said.

‘We need to be proactive and identify ways to disrupt the property crime market. For example, the QPS is now working with Queensland retailers to combat organised shoplifting networks.’

‘While property crime remains dominated by young, opportunistic offenders, a portion of the market is in fact organised which we see through the professional and systematic disposal of stolen goods.’

‘Only about 13 per cent of property reported stolen is ever recovered which suggests that it is being moved quickly and efficiently.’

Many property offenders have established disposal routes and are successfully disposing of stolen goods within three hours of acquiring them.

‘Our intelligence reveals that Queensland offenders are moving stolen goods interstate via vehicle, train and post and overseas by personal transport or shipment. We also have evidence to suggest that elements within the transport industry are involved in trafficking stolen goods interstate.’

The report also highlights areas of Queensland legislation that could be modified to enhance the QPS’ ability to regulate pawnbrokers and second-hand dealers to detect the disposal of stolen goods through these stores.

The report also concludes that a strong nexus exists between drug use and property crime and suggests that a reduction in illicit drug use would be likely to affect the property crime market. Therefore, it’s vital for the public and private sectors to monitor trends in illicit drugs and the connection with property offences and identify future research initiatives.

Last updated: 08 December 2011
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