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You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 17 July 2009 – 30 June 2010 CMC releases report into organised fraud in Queensland — 26.10.2009
You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 17 July 2009 – 30 June 2010 CMC releases report into organised fraud in Queensland — 26.10.2009
You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 17 July 2009 – 30 June 2010 CMC releases report into organised fraud in Queensland — 26.10.2009

CMC releases report into organised fraud in Queensland — 26.10.2009

Queenslanders are continuing to fall victim to online fraud, credit card scams and identity fraud despite the absence of sophisticated criminal networks operating from within the state, according to a Crime and Misconduct Commission report.

CMC Director, Intelligence, Chris Keen, says while organised criminal groups committing fraud have not been detected in Queensland, their impact on the community from outside our borders is significant.

‘Over the next three years we expect that criminal networks involved in online fraud and identity fraud will increase and warrants monitoring,’ Mr Keen said.

‘The opportunity for online fraud is increasing with the rise in internet usage. Since 2001 Australian consumers have more than doubled their internet usage from 35% of the population to 74% in 2008,’ Mr Keen said.

‘In the current global financial crisis organised fraud offenders are also taking advantage of cash-strapped employment seekers for use as ‘money mules’.

‘Money mules are people who are recruited and paid a commission to receive sums of money into their account which they then forward on to the organisers of the fraud. They may not even be aware they are participating in a fraudulent activity,’ Mr Keen said.

‘Usually, they are lured through advertised positions, either placed on legitimate employment websites or in spam advertisements. Brand names of well-known organisations are often used.

‘Identity fraud, including credit card fraud, is another area of concern. It’s the fastest-growing crime in Australia and costs Australians up to $4 billion annually. Much of this cost results from poor protection of personal details by members of the community.

‘While most credit card fraud in Queensland is committed by opportunistic offenders, organised fraud networks operating nationally and globally, extend into the state.

‘Queenslanders need to be more vigilant about protecting their personal details. If consumers stringently adhere to keeping their personal details for their internet and credit-card usage private, this will make it more difficult for fraud offenders,’ Mr Keen said.

CMC Director of Intelligence, Mr Chris Keen, is available for interview.


For further information, contact:
Helen Anderson or Leanne Hardyman
Ph: 07 3360 6395      Mobile: 0407 373 803      Fax: 07 3360 6235

Last updated: 07 December 2011
For all media enquiries, please contact:

[email protected] or
07 3360 6000

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