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You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 17 July 2009 – 30 June 2010 CMC releases report into police misconduct — 22.07.2009
You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 17 July 2009 – 30 June 2010 CMC releases report into police misconduct — 22.07.2009
You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 17 July 2009 – 30 June 2010 CMC releases report into police misconduct — 22.07.2009

CMC releases report into police misconduct — 22.07.2009

Crime and Misconduct Commission Chairman Robert Needham has warned that, unless all police officers actively embrace high ethical standards, misconduct in the Queensland Police Service will continue.

Mr Needham’s comments follow the release of a CMC report on Operation Capri - an investigation into police misconduct.

‘Operation Capri revealed multiple incidents of police misconduct, mainly relating to the involvement of police officers with a dangerous criminal informant,’ Mr Needham said.

‘The events detailed in the CMC report had the potential to undermine the integrity of the QPS.’

‘Misconduct such as that exposed by Operation Capri risks irreparable harm to the hard-won respect the QPS now enjoys. Without public confidence, the service cannot do its job.’

The investigation uncovered evidence which suggested police officers had:

  • improperly accessed confidential police information
  • accepted gifts and payments from an informant
  • enabled a prisoner to circumvent the official prison telephone system
  • offered rewards for confessions relating to offences.

As a result of Operation Capri, about 25 officers were implicated in police misconduct.

‘Most misconduct occurred in circumstances where there was poor supervision. In other cases the improper activities arose from a police culture where there was a belief that the end justified the needs,’ Mr Needham said.

‘There was an attitude that it was acceptable to ignore legislative and QPS policy requirements. These officers acted in ways that were improper, and in some cases dishonest and unlawful.

‘Sadly, their supervisors either encouraged this behaviour or placed blind trust in their subordinates. If the supervisors had been doing their job then the police misconduct may have been avoided.

‘This report revealed how relatively senior-ranking officers showed contempt for QPS policies and procedures. They were prepared to actively breach the law to achieve desired investigative outcomes. If that was the tone from supervisors, it is no wonder subordinates saw no reason to act differently.

Incompetent, dishonest or lazy officers should not be allowed to tarnish the name of the police service,’ Mr Needham said.

‘Without the pressure of public exposure, the CMC is not confident that the attitude of these officers will change. This is one of the reasons I have publicly released our investigative report.

‘I urge all police officers to read this report and learn from the mistakes of others. If they fail to do so, then the problems exposed by the CMC’s investigation will continue to arise.

‘The potential for misconduct to flourish will always exist. Constant vigilance is essential.

‘It’s now the responsibility of the Queensland Police Service to take action,’ Mr Needham said.


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Last updated: 16 January 2012
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