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You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 6 August 2008 – 23 June 2009 CMC research shows value of mandatory treatment — 24.11.2008
You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 6 August 2008 – 23 June 2009 CMC research shows value of mandatory treatment — 24.11.2008
You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 6 August 2008 – 23 June 2009 CMC research shows value of mandatory treatment — 24.11.2008

CMC research shows value of mandatory treatment — 24.11.2008

The Crime and Misconduct Commission has today released research suggesting offenders sentenced to mandatory drug and alcohol treatment have outcomes as good as those in voluntary treatment.

The CMC research paper, Mandatory treatment and perceptions of treatment effectiveness: a Queensland study of non-custodial offenders with drug and/or alcohol abuse problem, analyses data collected for the Offending Persons Across the Lifecourse (OPAL) research project which was conducted in 2007 by the CMC and supported by Queensland Corrective Services.

The project looked at the risks and needs of 480 non-custodial offenders in Queensland.

Dr Margot Legosz, Director, Research and Prevention, said the research looks at the relationship between drug and/or alcohol abuse patterns, treatment-seeking and treatment outcomes.

‘Mandatory treatment where offenders have the option of drug and/or alcohol abuse in lieu of other criminal justice sentences is relatively new, and research about its effectiveness is limited,’ she said.

‘But our research shows offenders with drug and/or alcohol abuse problems don’t need to be psychologically ready and motivated for treatment to get results.’

Dr Legosz said about 65% of respondents who underwent treatment reported positive outcomes regardless of whether the treatment was mandatory or voluntary.

‘These outcomes included using less drugs/alcohol, stopping drug and/or alcohol use for a while, or using drugs and alcohol more safely,’ she said.

‘The findings show that those with serious drug/alcohol problems are more likely to recognise their abuse as a problem, but are not more likely to seek voluntary treatment or have better outcomes than those with less severe addiction issues.

‘The results suggest people with serious substance abuse problems need support and encouragement to access treatment, so mandatory treatment for offenders may be an effective option,’ she said.

The study highlights the need for better understanding of the relationship between mandatory treatment and outcomes, including observations of the offenders’ motivation during treatment, and the content, nature and quality of the program.


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Last updated: 07 December 2011
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