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You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 2 July 2007 – 16 June 2008 CMC explores links between childhood abuse and adult offending — 07.08.2007
You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 2 July 2007 – 16 June 2008 CMC explores links between childhood abuse and adult offending — 07.08.2007
You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 2 July 2007 – 16 June 2008 CMC explores links between childhood abuse and adult offending — 07.08.2007

CMC explores links between childhood abuse and adult offending — 07.08.2007

A Crime and Misconduct Commission report into a rarely studied group of offenders will provide vital information to government agencies and the community to help reduce violence and crime.

CMC Director of Research and Prevention, Susan Johnson, says this comprehensive study of Queensland offenders on community supervision or probation orders is the first of its kind in Australia.

‘Up to now there has been a gap in information about this group. There is a lot of research on incarcerated prisoners, but little known about the history and needs of those serving non-custodial sentences,’ Ms Johnson said.

‘With the help of Queensland Corrective Services, we carried out face-to-face interviews across the state with male and female offenders from both Indigenous and non-Indigenous backgrounds. With their cooperation, we now have a unique insight into their lives.

‘The research has revealed that offenders serving non-custodial orders often lead chaotic, challenging and disadvantaged lives. For example, as children, many experienced physical and emotional abuse, parental alcohol and drug abuse, and violence between their parents.

‘Many continued to be victimised into adulthood, and there is a high risk that their own children could be exposed to the cycle of violence and crime.

‘The harms experienced by these offenders far exceed those of any other group in the general Australian population, but are in line with results from studies of incarcerated prisoners.

‘The CMC’s study illustrates how important it is to invest in early intervention and treatment programs that can meet the varied needs of these people and help break the cycle of abuse and violence.

‘Government agencies, schools and the community should embrace these findings for the practical opportunities they present. It’s a chance to develop future practical solutions to prevent this group from re-offending and being repeat victims of abuse.

‘The CMC acknowledges that Queensland Corrective Services is committed to both rehabilitation and treatment of custodial prisoners to help reduce recidivism. This study has reinforced the importance of these programs for offenders under community supervision orders,’ Ms Johnson said.


Media inquiries: Leanne Hardyman – Media Adviser
Ph:  07 3360 6344     Mobile:  0407 373 803     Fax:  3360 6235

 

Last updated: 18 January 2012
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