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You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 19 July 2006 – 28 June 2007 CMC profiles Queensland amphetamine market — 15.12.2006
You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 19 July 2006 – 28 June 2007 CMC profiles Queensland amphetamine market — 15.12.2006
You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases Media releases — 19 July 2006 – 28 June 2007 CMC profiles Queensland amphetamine market — 15.12.2006

CMC profiles Queensland amphetamine market — 15.12.2006

Queensland’s law enforcement agencies have been provided with a detailed picture of the state’s amphetamine market following the release of a Crime and Misconduct Commission (CMC) report.

Profiling the Queensland Amphetamine Market brings together the views of amphetamine users and those who respond to the challenges of illicit drug use. It combines data collected by the Amphetamines in Queensland research project with information collected from representatives from health, research, law enforcement and non-government organisations.

The report describes the characteristics of amphetamine users, outlines users’ perceptions of law enforcement and assesses the impact of law enforcement activity on the amphetamine market.

The CMC’s Research and Prevention Director Susan Johnson says the report highlights a high degree of amphetamine demand in Queensland.

‘Amphetamine use has become “normalised” among users - that is, users regard consuming this illicit drug as a normal activity,’ she said.

‘In an analysis of amphetamine usage patterns (for the six months prior to the survey conducted in 2002):

• 64% of respondents said they had used speed powder
• 63% said they had used base
• 28% had used ice.

‘In the six months before the survey, typically base amphetamine was used on 30 days, speed powder was used on 20 days and ice was used on 10 days.

‘In addition to this, four in 10 respondents stated that they were not interested in ceasing their amphetamine use.’

Ms Johnson says, despite the prevalence of amphetamines in Queensland, criminal justice strategies do affect amphetamine market dynamics.

‘Avoiding trouble with police and the law were regarded as important factors when considering possible reasons to stop using and selling amphetamines,’ she said.

‘Nearly three out of four respondents believed that police made selling amphetamines a “very” or “quite” risky activity and 42 per cent of survey participants reported that an acquaintance or friend had been arrested for amphetamine-related offences in the prior six months.

‘It is also likely that a number of strategies recently implemented by law enforcement and other stakeholders will affect the nature of the Queensland amphetamine market. These include legislation amendments and the increased regulation of precursor chemicals used to manufacture amphetamines.’

The report also identifies some of the harmful health effects associated with amphetamine use. Most respondents stated that health issues were significant to them, highlighting the importance of integrating law enforcement and health responses to amphetamine use.

The CMC’s Intelligence Director Chris Keen says the report will help decision-makers in government, especially law enforcement and health agencies, formulate effective illicit drug policy initiatives at both state and local level.

‘Amphetamine demand, the normalisation of amphetamine use among users, the closed nature of  the amphetamine market and the regulation of precursor chemicals are some of the central challenges currently facing those involved in the development and implementation of illicit drug strategies.

‘Understanding the nature of illicit drug use through reports such as this one just released today, however, can help.

‘The CMC employs a broad drug use monitoring strategy using information from a range of different sources.

‘Each new wave of survey data builds up an increasingly valuable source of information for decision-makers to use.’

The preparation of the report was funded by the National Drug Strategy Law Enforcement Funding Committee of the Queensland Police Service. The Amphetamines in Queensland research project was collaboratively undertaken in 2002 by the Crime and Misconduct Commission and Queensland Health. The data collected was supplemented in December 2005 by information at focus group discussions with staff from health, research, law enforcement and non-government organisations.

The report is available on the CMC’s website now, and printed copies will be available within the next two weeks.


Media inquiries:
Stephen Dalziel – Communications Officer (Media)
Ph:  07 3360 6344          Mobile:  0407 373 803          Fax:  3360 6235

 

 

Last updated: 18 January 2012

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