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You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases CMC restrains assets connected with alleged heroin trafficker - 16.08.2012
You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases CMC restrains assets connected with alleged heroin trafficker - 16.08.2012
You are here: Home News and media CMC media releases CMC restrains assets connected with alleged heroin trafficker - 16.08.2012

CMC restrains assets connected with alleged heroin trafficker - 16.08.2012

The Crime and Misconduct Commission (CMC) has restrained more than $200 000 in assets associated with 42-year-old Gold Coast man, Sadri Ahmetaj, the alleged mastermind behind a multi-million-dollar heroin ring.

In May, the CMC closed a major drug distribution network operating in south-east Queensland, following an 18-month covert investigation codenamed Operation Storm (see related media release).

The network is alleged to have distributed at least 20 kilograms of heroin, with an estimated street value of $25 million, between 2006 and 2012.

Operation Storm has resulted in 20 people facing a total of 60 charges.

Mr Ahmetaj is facing seven charges, including trafficking in a dangerous drug (heroin) and possessing dangerous drugs (methylamphetamine, ecstasy and cannabis). He remains in custody and is due to re-appear in the Brisbane Magistrates Court on 27 August.

Separately, on 10 August, in the Brisbane Supreme Court, the CMC’s Proceeds of Crime team was granted a restraining order targeting Mr Ahmetaj’s interest in a range of assets. The total value of the restraining order is $216 195. The assets include two Gold Coast properties, five cars (including a 2004 Bentley Continental GT Coupe) and a boat.

CMC Assistant Commissioner Crime Kathleen Florian says the restraining order sends a clear message that criminals will not profit from their illegal activities in Queensland. 

‘The CMC will continue to doggedly pursue the ill-gotten gains of organised criminals,’ Ms Florian said.

‘By doing so, we financially cripple their operations and ensure that any profits from their crimes are returned to the state to be spent on services for all Queenslanders.’

The CMC has returned $38 884 636 to the state and restrained $147 582 952  worth of property since 2003, when the Criminal Proceeds Confiscation Act 2002 came into force.  

The CMC is responsible for administering the state’s non-conviction-based civil confiscation scheme under the Act, giving it the power to restrain property on the basis of a reasonable suspicion of serious crime-related activity, regardless of whether or not a person has been charged with an offence.

Ms Florian said the 20 people netted as a result of Operation Storm included eight people charged with drug trafficking:

  • Two Ashgrove women, both aged 53
  • A 42-year-old Mt Gravatt man
  • A 23-year-old Marsden man
  • A 42-year-old Labrador man (Sadri Ahmetaj)
  • An 80-year-old Chipping Norton (NSW) man
  • A 63-year-old Parkes (NSW) man
  • A 39-year-old Mudgee (NSW) woman

The other 12 people are facing a range of charges, including drug, property and weapons offences.

Operation Storm began in December 2010, and involved collaboration with the Queensland Police Service, New South Wales Drug Squad and the Australian Federal Police (Serious and Organised Crime team).

For further information or to request an interview with CMC Assistant Commissioner Crime Kathleen Florian, please contact CMC Media Adviser Shelley Thomas: 07 3360 6275 / 0407 373 803.

Read more about how the CMC recovers the proceeds of crime.

Last updated: 14 December 2012
For all media enquiries, please contact:

[email protected] or
07 3360 6000

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